Everyday Sexism

“With Seat, you don’t have to think: The car that understands women.”

I found this website and twitter feed online (everydaysexism.com) where anyone can write an instance where sexism has affected them. The entries range from things that happened this week to things that happened 30 years ago. The terrible thing is that the crassness hasn’t changed.

The website says that “By sharing your story you’re showing the world that sexism does exist, it is faced by women everyday and it is a valid problem to discuss.”

Examples:

Kaisa  2012-10-02 12:58

“My first experience of men commenting on my breasts was when I was 11 years old (over 20 years ago) and walking home from the corner shop after buying sweets. I wore a loose crop top my mum had made for me and a man in his 50s walked past and commented “Your breasts have started growing.”. I remember feeling embarrassed and scared. I still feel sad about that particular incident, because it was the beginning of my journey into adulthood where I know to expect sexist comments and actions from men. It is not a question of “if” but “when”. It can be scary and in the past has made me feel really shit about myself. Nowadays I have a good range of verbal and non-verbal put-downs for idiots who are stupid enough to make sexist comments at me.”

Laura      2012-10-02 09:02

“A male friend of mine has just started working at a utilities company in a customer facing role. He said that he’d never ever witnessed such gross sexism, racism, homophobia. He said that when his colleagues whistled at/commented on every single woman passing by that he wanted to curl up with embarrassment and shout “it wasn’t me”. I asked whether he could report this behaviour anonymously to a manager but he said that it was so utterly endemic that he would have to report everyone.”

Kate      2012-10-01 09:40

“Answered the door this morning to a salesman – ‘Hello, is your husband home?'”
There’s a common theme here. No one is actively doing anything to stop this. It will continue until concerned people like us stand up and fight it as soon as we see it. And as I know I have stated in earlier blogs, we need to start teaching our children how they should treat people while they’re young. There’s hope for us yet.
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